Some pieces of paper your Health Center may be missing.

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I have worked at a few camps over the years, and they all had different ways of doing things.. Sometimes in conversations with other camp nurses, I am shocked to find that some items that I find indispensable are not in common use at other camps. So here are a few items that I have used and believe should be in every health office. 


1. A Medical Resource Sheet.

This is a list of outside healthcare providers and vendors you have used in the past or have identified as potentially being needed. Who is your camp’s choice for hospital, urgent care, pharmacy, dentist, orthodontics, optometrist, dermatologist, and orthopedist? What is the phone number, address, and office hours?  Are there special instructions for making or attending appointments? Taking a few minutes to write all this down will make life easier for you and any future nurses who may need to arrange care for special health situations. Once the sheet is made, every year it can simply be checked and updated. 


2. Outside Appointment Communication Sheet.

When sending campers to outside appointments, make a form that has a communication section for the camp nurse to document pertinent information; and another section for the outside staff to send messages back. This prevents campers or support staff form dropping the communication ball at any stage of the appointment and provides a record of instructions and findings from outside appointments that can be filed in the camp’s chart. Be sure to leave room on the top for the appointment time, location, and camper’s name so you can write them out ahead of time and keep them organized. 


3. Organizational Chart.

Every year, the persons occupying management or supervisory
positions in camp change. Taking time early on to draw an organizational chart clearly showing who is in charge of what, and who you should talk to in specific departments. Don't forget support services such as maintenance, kitchen, swim, and athletics. You may not think you need this, but I promise if you draw it, you will use it.

 

4. An In-patient/sick Camper Data Sheet.

Most camps use narrative documentation for visits, however narrative documentation can be cumbersome for campers who are sick and
staying in the health center. It's also not easy to quickly see when the patent had temps, meds, or meal intake. A simple flow sheet can be made to capture this data in one easy to read place. This sheet can then be filed in the campers chart once the camper returns to normal activities. 


Are there any forms or information sheets you find useful at your camp? Please tell me
about them in the comments section.